Journal Article: Care for children and young people with eating disorders

This article was published in the journal ‘Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry’ (June 2020) and may be of interest:

Paediatric medical care for children and young people with eating disorders: Achievements and where to next

Lee D Hudson and Simon Chapman

No other diagnoses epitomise the need for dual consideration of mental and physical health more than eating disorders. Anorexia Nervosa (AN) for example has the highest mortality rate of any mental health disorder, and half of deaths are thought to be due to physical complications (Sullivan, 1995). For this reason it is crucial for acute paediatrics and eating disorder teams to work closely over the assessment and management of these disorders, particularly in the early stages when physical risks are often highest.

This is not as easy as it sounds: mental health and physical health teams are often geographical distant from each other, have different ways of working, and may even view and speak of risk in different ways. Despite this, as for many countries, in the United Kingdom (UK), the journey to provide better paediatric care for children and young people (CYP) with eating disorders has been a gradual one, albeit with a number of recent victories. As two paediatricians working with CYP with eating disorders and eating disorder teams in the UK, we summarise the important developments of the past 10 years in the UK, and look to future steps…

To read the full article, click on the link below:

https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/pdf/10.1177/1359104520931573

RCPCH: State of Child Health 2020

In March, the RCPCH published its ‘State of Child Health 2020’ report. This landmark report provides a snapshot of infant, children and young people’s physical and mental health. 

The RCPCH say: “On 4 March 2020, RCPCH launched our new State of Child Health. The update provides the latest data from our 2017 indicators, alongside evidence for new indicators, including: looked after children, mental health, youth violence, young carers and the child health workforce. Alongside this, we’ve spoken to 2,000 children and young people to find out what makes them feel “healthy, happy and well”.

We’ve outlined our key asks for each of the UK Governments, which we hope will ensure delivery of key policy decisions to improve child health outcomes.

The State of Child Health 2020 Report utilises comparable UK data across 27 child health and wellbeing indicators to produce a range of associated recommendations aimed at improving outcomes. It builds on the 2017 Report which provided an unprecedented snapshot of how infant, children and young people’s physical and mental health was faring across the UK.  

Click below to read the report:

http://www.rcpch.ac.uk/state-of-child-health

Attachment Matters Survey

Request for contributors to a Survey of Routinely Used Interventions for Improving Attachment in Infants and Children

Please could you pass this link on to all your team members and colleagues who work with children and / or their caregivers therapeutically.

A team of researchers at UCL and the University of York are conducting an important survey of current practice in the UK for 0-13 year old children with, or who are at risk of, attachment problems, and / or their caregivers.

We are  contacting as many teams and individual practitioners as possible across the UK. 

Our aim is to build a picture of the availability of different kinds of support for those children and families as this information is currently not known. The results will be essential for setting priorities for clinical practice and establishing the availability of attachment interventions in different areas for this group of children. 

We hope to find out about face-to-face working, and not online provision. This work will also play an important role in strengthening the evidence base underpinning those interventions. Survey responses will be anonymous, no individuals will be identified in any published materials arising from this  project.

The survey should take no more than 20 minutes to complete and can be completed on desktop computer or on mobile phones or tablets.

To read the information sheet and to take part, all you have to do is click the link below, which will take you to a secure online survey:

https://redcap.slms.ucl.ac.uk/surveys/?s=FJRL7A9EHX

IACAPAP 2020 (Singapore): Call for abstracts for Poster Presentations

The 24th World Congress of the International Association of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry and Allied Professions (IACAPAP), which will be held in Singapore between the 20th and 23rd July, has issued a call for abstracts for poster presentations. They say:

Submit an abstract and be selected as a Poster Presenter at the 24th World Congress…. Submission is open to all health care professionals, academics and researchers from all fields of applications and backgrounds with an interest in mental health.

ABSTRACT TOPICS INCLUDE:
– Addictive Disorders
– Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
– Autism Spectrum and Developmental Disorders
– Mood and Anxiety Disorders
– Basic Science and Imaging
– Bipolar DisorderEducation and Learning
– Epidemiology

To view the full list of abstract topics and submission guidelines, click here

You can submit an abstract here. The deadline for submitting abstracts has been extended until February 10.

To read more about the conference, click here. Early booking rates are available for the conference until March 11.



NCEPOD – Mental Healthcare in Young People and Young Adults 2019

The National Confidential Enquiry into Patient Outcome and Death (NCEPOD) recently published a review of the quality of care provided to children and young people with mental health conditions admitted to a general health hospital or mental health facility and an assessment of healthcare utilisation in this group using routinely collected national datasets.

Click on the link below to go to the publication:

NCEPOD – Mental Healthcare in Young People and Young Adults (2019)

Help identify priorities for preventing suicide amongst autistic people 

On average, autistic people are nine times more likely to die by suicide than non-autistic people. Leading researchers and charities are looking for health professionals, policy makers and service providers to join autistic people and their families in helping shape future prevention plans.

Please consider completing this online survey about priorities for research and policy:

Complete the Survey

The project is led by Dr Sarah Cassidy at Nottingham University with support from Newcastle and Coventry Universities, the UK’s autism research charity Autistica, the NIHR’s James Lind Alliance and international autism research organisation INSAR.