PMHA Winter Meeting 2023 – Call for Abstracts

The Paediatric Mental Health Association invites trainees in Paediatrics, Psychiatry, General Practice, and Emergency Medicine to submit abstracts for our Annual Winter Meeting

The meeting, taking place at Minster Mill in Oxfordshire on the 26th and 27th January 2023, attracts speakers and delegates from a wide range of specialties to discuss the latest research and updates in Child Mental Health.

This year’s meeting will feature a trainee-led poster session in which trainees can present their audits, research, or quality improvement projects. This is an excellent opportunity to showcase your work in the area of child mental health and to share best practice with interested professionals from around the country. Three abstracts will also be selected for oral presentation on Day Two of the meeting (27th January). 

To submit an abstract, please click here to download a template, and then email your completed abstract to PMHAtrainees@gmail.com by December 16th at the latest.

Your abstract will be reviewed by members of the PMHA Executive Committee and you will be notified of acceptance by the 20th of December.

We look forward to receiving your abstracts and to welcoming you to our meeting in January!

Booking opening soon for the 2023 PMHA Winter Meeting!

After two years of meeting virtually, we are so looking forward to welcoming you all to the beautiful Minster Mill in Oxfordshire on the 26th and 27th January for the 2023 PMHA Annual Meeting.

We are currently finalising a fabulous programme with something for everyone, whether you work in CAMHS or Paediatrics, in hospital wards, the Emergency Department or the community. There will also be an opportunity for trainees to share the amazing work you’ve been doing over the last year.

Booking will be opening soon, so make sure to save the date!

Interested in Mental Health Leadership in Paediatrics?

Did you miss the PMHA Summer Meeting on Thursday 7th July 2022? You can still find out about this role here:

In 2020, the RCPCH issued a position statement that outlines the role of Paediatricians in supporting children and young people’s mental health and makes key recommendations to ensure their mental health needs are met. One of the recommendations was to have a Mental Health Lead in every team. Click here for full details about this.

More recently, NHS England created a website to outline the NHS response to meeting the challenge of increasing referrals to mental health services This gives links to useful resources and guidelines. Click here to learn more about this.

On 30 March 2022, the RCPCH hosted a webinar about the role that Paediatricians can play in supporting children and young people’s mental health. Click here to watch a recording of this Webinar.

PMHA Summer Meeting: The role of a Mental Health Lead

Dear All, 

Just a reminder about the upcoming PMHA Summer meeting on
Thursday 7th July from 1pm.
This will be useful for Paediatric trainees and consultants interested in becoming departmental mental health leads, or for those already in the role and keen to know what support is available. 

Provisional programme:

13:30 – Welcome and Introductions

13:40 – Dr. Karen Street, RCPCH Officer for Mental Health: “The Role of Paediatricians in Supporting Mental Health”

14:25 – Dr. Richard Sankar, Child and Adolescent Psychiatrist, “Navigating Commissioning within Child Mental Health”

15:10 – Break

15:20 – Dr. Emma Blake, PMHA Convenor: “Building Networks and Getting Support in Your Role as Mental Health Lead”

16:05 – Dr. James Dearden, Paediatric Mental Health Lead: “Working as a Mental Health Lead in General Paediatrics”

16:50 – Close

 As usual, please sign up using your professional email address (@nhs.net or nhs.uk) via the link below and we will contact you when your registration has been approved.

Click here


Best Wishes, 
The PMHA Trainee Team

RCPCH Annual Conference

28 June 2022 – 30 June 2022 in Liverpool

The Paediatric Mental Health Association (PMHA) and Young People’s Health Special Interest Group (YPSIG) have a session on Thursday 30th June

The schedule for the session:

10:15-10:20 Introduction and welcome, Dr Emma Blake & Dr Katie Malbon
10:20-10:50Support for young people, families and ourselves
Lydia Tweed, Papyrus
10:50-11:10“20 things I have leant about suicide since October 21”
Dr Ian Rodd, Consultant Paediatrician, Hampshire Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust
11:10-11:20Service evaluation of a treatment and management proforma for eating disorders, used on a general paediatric ward, Abstract ID 245
Ms Anna Grundy, Medical Student, Faculty of Medicine, University of Southampton
11:20-11:30Grownish: How And When To Include Adolescents In Adult Research, Abstract ID 130
Dr Martin Edwards, Cardiff and Vale UHB – Child Health
Dr Rhian Turner-Thomas, Noah’s Ark Children’s Hospital for Wales
11:30-12:00Comfort break and Poster Viewing
12:00-12:20Voices of Young People and Families
12:20-12:50“Starting the Conversation”
Esta Orchard, Education lead, Association for Young People’s health
(Facilitated discussion about how participants can support suicide prevention in their roles and what support / resources are needed to help with this)
12:50-13:00A snapshot of Adverse Childhood Experiences Among International Medical Students and their impact on Holistic Health During the COVID-19 Pandemic, Abstract ID 937
Dr Tim Carr, University of Medicine and Pharmacy, “Grigore T Popa”, Iași
13:00-13:10The double impact of the pandemic on BAME young people’s mental and emotional wellbeing: the effects of racial inequality and COVID-19, Abstract ID 1266
Prof Monica Lakhanpaul, University College London Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health
Dr Anita Sharma, Royal Holloway, University of London
13:10-13:15Close and Summary

Please click here for more details or click here for information on how to book

Webinar 19: Maternal anxiety associated with childhood food allergy and psychological intervention 

The next PMHA Webinar will be on Monday 16th May at 7.30pm.

It is on “Maternal anxiety associated with childhood food allergy and psychological intervention”, and will be given by Dr Matthew Hodes, Honorary Clinical Senior Lecturer in Child & Adolescent Psychiatry at Imperial College London, and Dr Bea Vickers, Consultant Psychiatrist, South West London and St Georges Mental Health NHS Trust.  

Please sign up using your professional email address (@nhs.net or nhs.uk) via the link below and we will contact you when your registration has been approved.

Click here to register for the webinar

Research highlight

Surveillance methodology has been widely used in paediatrics (British Paediatric Surveillance Unit, BPSU) and psychiatry (Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Surveillance System, CAPSS) to provide epidemiological data on conditions of interest. This study aimed to investigate the degree to which community paediatricians are involved in the care of children and young people (CYP) with mental health conditions, with implications for the surveillance of these conditions.

The authors concluded that community paediatricians are most involved in the care of children with neurodevelopmental disorders, and that joint BPSU and CAPSS surveillance would be recommended for these disorders. Whilst community paediatricians are also involved in the care of CYP with emotional difficulties, often due to limited access to CAMHS, it was felt that the decision for single or joint surveillance should be made after consideration of all relevant factors. The authors also highlighted the urgent need to expand CAMHS services in order to provide support for CYP with emotional difficulties, who are currently being managed by community paediatricians.

Involvement of community paediatricians in the care of children and young people with mental health difficulties in the UK: implications for case ascertainment by child and adolescent psychiatric, and paediatric surveillance systems

Ayyash HF, Ogundele MO, Lynn RM, et al. Involvement of community paediatricians in the care of children and young people with mental health difficulties in the UK: implications for case ascertainment by child and adolescent psychiatric, and paediatric surveillance systems. BMJ Paediatrics Open 2021;5:e000713. doi: 10.1136/bmjpo-2020-000713

Follow this link to read the full paper.

Research highlight

The bidirectional interplay between physical and mental health is well recognised, and yet the research methodology used to study the impact of childhood chronic illness on mental health outcomes has in the past often been suboptimal. A recently published longitudinal study aimed to remediate this by using data from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) to explore the relationship between chronic childhood illness and adolescent psychiatric disorders, including possible mediating factors, in children aged between 10 and 15 years.

One of the main study findings was that a high level of health-related school absenteeism was the most consistent predictor of mental health problems in adolescents. While there are multiple possible explanations for this, it nevertheless provides an important and interesting insight into the impact of chronic illness on a child’s life and health outcomes.  

Chronic illness in childhood and early adolescence: a longitudinal exploration of co-occurring mental illness

Brady AM, Deighton J, Stansfeld S. Chronic illness in childhood and early adolescence: A longitudinal exploration of co-occurring mental illness. Dev Psychopathol. 2021 Aug;33(3):885-898. doi: 10.1017/S0954579420000206. PMID: 32362290.

Follow this link to read the full paper.

Research highlight

Secure parent-infant relationships are a crucial factor in ensuring good mental and physical wellbeing throughout life. The Parent-Infant Foundation recently published this report, which includes a summary of qualitative and quantitative research conducted with parents, focusing on the parent-infant relationship.

Here are some of the key research findings, but do follow this link to read the full report (page 25-29 for the parent research).

  • Parents ranked the parent-infant relationship as the third most important influence on child development, below the impact of domestic violence and parental drug use.
  • 50% of parents thought there was not enough support available for developing the parent-infant relationship.
  • The fear of judgement and stigma are barriers to parents seeking support with their parent-infant relationship.

Securing Healthy Lives: An extended summary of research about parent-infant relationship help and support across Cwm Taf Morgannwg

Bateson DK., Sercombe M., Hamilton W. Securing Healthy Lives: An extended summary of research about parent-infant relationship help and support across Cwm Taf Morgannwg. Parent-Infant Foundation. December 2021.

Updated Annual Meeting Programme

We have just updated the programme for the PMHA Annual Winter Meeting 2022 (January 27th and 28th), adding more great speakers and sessions to the line up.

To view the updated programme, click here.

The online meeting is a great opportunity to network with other professionals working in paediatrics and mental health, and to update yourself on the latest research and developments in the field.

If you have not already booked for the meeting, there is still time to do so. Members of the PMHA can attend at a special discounted price.

Click here for more information and to register.