World Mental Health Day

Today, October 10, is World Mental Health Day. In connection with this, we wanted to tell you about this great training tool:

We Can Talk is an online training tool to improve staff knowledge and confidence when supporting children and young people attending A&E and hospital wards due to concerns about their mental health.

It is free, takes less than an hour, and features young people with lived experience.

Click on the link below to start this training:

We Can Talk

Upcoming Event: Enhancing young people’s mental wellbeing through digital technology

Delivered via Zoom
On the 6th November, from 09.30am – 12.30pm
From £30pp, includes CPD certificate.
 

Next month, the Oxford and Reading ACAMH Branch are offering an online event titled ‘Enhancing young people’s mental wellbeing through digital technology’.

“Now more than ever we need to be considering the impact of digital media on the mental health of young people, both positive and negative, and how we can support them. We will discuss the key challenges faced in relation to child and adolescent mental health in the fast-paced digital environment.

Dr. Amy Orben, Dr. Ann Oszivadjian, Professor Pete Etchells, and Mary Jane Stroud look at how digital tech affects well-being, an autism app, gaming, and the impact of digital media on the mental health of young people, both positive and negative, and how we can support them.

Click below to read more or to book a place:
Full details.

Royal College of Psychiatrists

Useful Resources: Young People’s mental Health

The Royal College of Psychiatrists has a wide range of useful information about young people’s mental health written to support young people, as well as their parents and carers.

The information is written by psychiatrists and young people working together. It includes information on topics such as…

coping with stress
depression in children and young people
worries about weight and eating problems
drugs and alcohol
psychosis and schizophrenia for young people

Click on the links above to go to the specific section, or click on the link below to go an overview of all the information:

https://www.rcpsych.ac.uk/mental-health/parents-and-young-people

Featured

RCPCH statement on Child Mental Health

1st September 2020

Mental health issues are increasingly common among children and young people—suicide is now the leading cause of death for both males and females aged five to 19 years old, and one in eight people among this age group is currently living with a mental health condition. 

Children and young people in vulnerable groups are even more at risk, including LGBTQ+ people, low income households, children in care, and those with parental mental health issues, special educational needs, on child protection plans, or in the criminal justice system. 

Underinvestment in mental health is a longstanding concern. This has been amplified by the pandemic due to the extra stress caused by prolonged school closures, social isolation, adverse social and environmental circumstances, and a lack of access to usual support services. 

RCPCH’s Assistant Officer for Mental Health and Wellbeing, Dr Karen Street, says: “Our key message is that our patients’ mental health is our business. There is a joint responsibility to provide necessary services across the children’s workforce. 

“In the wake of COVID-19, many children and young people will have greater mental health support needs. As services begin to recover, the time is ripe to connect across the entire child health workforce and local, regional, and national boundaries. Together, we can work to develop improved and integrated mental health services.” 

In its statement, the College includes a number of recommendations, including: 

  • All paediatric teams should have a nominated lead for mental health. 
  • Paediatric training must include promotion of wellbeing in children and young people and management of common mental health issues. 
  • Paediatricians with higher exposure to issues need more extensive training and support. 
  • Paediatricians should not be expected to work in isolation when managing severe cases of mental illness. 
  • Use of mental health screening tools in higher risk people should be considered. 

The College will also continue to support mental health through its activities, including: 

  • Having an Assistant Officer for Mental Health on its Health Improvement Committee. 
  • Working with NHSE and HEE to implement of the NHSE Long Term Plan. 
  • Developing training through its Child Mental Health Specialty Advisory Committee. 
  • Developing the Progress curriculum for all paediatric trainees to include mental health. 
  • Partnering with MindEd to produce a paediatric ‘learning path’. 

Read the College’s full position statement on the role of paediatricians in mental health here

UNICEF Report: Children in Lockdown – What Coronavirus means for UK children

“Children’s lives have been turned upside down by coronavirus. For some children, with the right support and resources, the situation will
be manageable, but for others the effects of the pandemic will cast a long shadow over their lives. The response to coronavirus already is exposing the fragile situation that many children and young people live in. Hundreds of thousands of children who rely on school, health and social systems and the support of the voluntary sector are being left unprotected as these systems are weakened. Thousands more, unknown to the system, will likely find themselves in need of support over the coming weeks, but as yet remain invisible to authorities…

Click here to read full report.

Reminder: Time to book for the PMHA Annual Meeting at Highgate House

The meeting will be held on January 23 & 24, 2020

It is a great opportunity to update your knowledge and skills, meet colleagues from a wide range of disciplines, and enjoy the lovely facilities of Highgate House, as well as to make new friends or meet up with old ones.

If you would like to come to the meeting, it’s advisable to book your place as soon as possible. We look forward to seeing you there!

NCEPOD – Mental Healthcare in Young People and Young Adults 2019

The National Confidential Enquiry into Patient Outcome and Death (NCEPOD) recently published a review of the quality of care provided to children and young people with mental health conditions admitted to a general health hospital or mental health facility and an assessment of healthcare utilisation in this group using routinely collected national datasets.

Click on the link below to go to the publication:

NCEPOD – Mental Healthcare in Young People and Young Adults (2019)