Request for information:

Any guidance on managing unwell children in acute settings who have learning difficulties or autism

Dr. Cassie Coleman, a paediatrician in Oxford, is looking for anyone who is aware of any guidance on managing unwell children in acute settings who have learning difficulties or autism.

They are going to write guidance in Oxford but would be grateful if anyone has already done some work on this in their regions and is happy to share.

If you have any information, please can you email it to: cass81@doctors.org.uk

Thank you!

Another interesting article in The Guardian

We should be overhauling the school system, not rushing to send children back

By Suzanne Moore on Monday 18th May, 2020.

“The emotional and social development of our children is paramount, not a rushed, unsafe return to constant invigilation.”

Click here to read the whole article:
https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2020/may/18/we-should-be-overhauling-the-school-system-not-rushing-to-send-children-back

Let us know your comments or thoughts …

Interesting article by Lee Hudson ( Consultant Paediatrician at Great Ormond Street Hospital, London)

Reopen the schools or a generation will bear the mental health scars

Click below to read the full article:

https://www.theguardian.com/global/commentisfree/2020/may/17/reopen-the-schools-or-a-generation-will-bear-the-mental-health-scars

A debate about the complex issues involved in these decisions could be useful in forming future policies. Comments please!

Children and the Internet: Advice from the NSPCC

The Internet is playing a growing role in most of our lives, including the lives of children. Especially during the current Coronavirus situation, many children are making use of the Internet to connect with their schools, as well as for home learning and entertainment.

Whilst the Internet offers many great educational and fun things for children, it also presents some risks.

The NSPCC has published a range of useful resources to help parents and carers ensure their children use the Internet safely, including:

UNICEF Report: Children in Lockdown – What Coronavirus means for UK children

“Children’s lives have been turned upside down by coronavirus. For some children, with the right support and resources, the situation will
be manageable, but for others the effects of the pandemic will cast a long shadow over their lives. The response to coronavirus already is exposing the fragile situation that many children and young people live in. Hundreds of thousands of children who rely on school, health and social systems and the support of the voluntary sector are being left unprotected as these systems are weakened. Thousands more, unknown to the system, will likely find themselves in need of support over the coming weeks, but as yet remain invisible to authorities…

Click here to read full report.

Coronavirus Resources

We’ve put together a range of resources to help children and young people, as well as their parents and carers during the current situation.

For young people:

  • The Anna Freud National Center for Children and Families has produced this video giving advice for young people about managing their mental health and wellbeing during the coronavirus situation.

Talking with children:

For parents and carers

  • The Anna Freud National Centre for Children and Families has also produced this video with guidance to parents and carers about how they can help children and young people manage their mental health and wellbeing during any disruption caused by the Coronavirus.
  • Norfolk County Council has produced these tips for staying healthy and happy while at home.




Do you know of any more resources we should include here?
Please send us an email at ContactPMHA@gmail.com

Attachment Matters Survey

Request for contributors to a Survey of Routinely Used Interventions for Improving Attachment in Infants and Children

Please could you pass this link on to all your team members and colleagues who work with children and / or their caregivers therapeutically.

A team of researchers at UCL and the University of York are conducting an important survey of current practice in the UK for 0-13 year old children with, or who are at risk of, attachment problems, and / or their caregivers.

We are  contacting as many teams and individual practitioners as possible across the UK. 

Our aim is to build a picture of the availability of different kinds of support for those children and families as this information is currently not known. The results will be essential for setting priorities for clinical practice and establishing the availability of attachment interventions in different areas for this group of children. 

We hope to find out about face-to-face working, and not online provision. This work will also play an important role in strengthening the evidence base underpinning those interventions. Survey responses will be anonymous, no individuals will be identified in any published materials arising from this  project.

The survey should take no more than 20 minutes to complete and can be completed on desktop computer or on mobile phones or tablets.

To read the information sheet and to take part, all you have to do is click the link below, which will take you to a secure online survey:

https://redcap.slms.ucl.ac.uk/surveys/?s=FJRL7A9EHX

The PMHA will be at the Royal College of Paediatrics conference (28th April)

A short post to say that the PMHA is going to be at the annual Royal College of Paediatrics meeting on Tuesday 28th April 2020.

The PMHA session is linked with the British Association of Paediatricians in Audiology (BAPA).

The theme of the PMHA / BAPA joint session is ‘difference and self’. Sound intriguing? Why not come along to find out more.

We look forward to seeing you there!