Attend ACAMH’s 2020 Events Online

Did you know that you can now see a lots of ACAMH events from wherever you might be at the moment?

With the global spread of the coronavirus, many organisations across the world are changing working practices to ensure everyone’s safety. One such organisation is the Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health (ACAMH), which will not be staging physical events for the rest of 2020, but instead is bringing events online as live webinars, many of which will be free.

There are also a number of recorded webinars already available for view, including:

More will be added to the ACAMH website’s Freeview section, which contains a whole host of other past lectures.

Anna Freud Learning Network

The Anna Freud Learning Network is a free national network for professionals, both individuals and organisations, which shares the latest research, resources, and learning opportunities to those working to transform the mental health of children and young people.

To find out more and to join the network, please click on the link below

https://www.annafreud.org/mental-health-professionals/anna-freud-learning-network

24th World Congress of the International Association for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Allied Professions’ (IACAPAP)

The virtual edition of the 24th World Congress of IACAPAP will be held from 2 – 4 December 2020. Themed “Starting from the Beginning – Laying the Foundation for Lifelong Mental Health”, this 3-day virtual congress will cover issues that are close to our hearts, as well as emerging trends and topics of interests to the adolescent and child psychiatry community.

Reasons to attend:

  • Join the programme designed to cater to delegates from different time zones, and engage live with speakers and presenters
  • Get access to session recordings on demand, even after the congress
  • Experience comprehensive programme featuring cutting-edge research and trends in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
  • Gain international networking opportunities with potential collaborative partners, sponsors and exhibitors
  • Garner invaluable insights and experiences from renowned industry and academic experts

Visit www.iacapap2020.org for more information.

Read read more about IACAPAP 2020 in the email newsletter.

COVID-19: Child & Adolescent Mental Healthcare – Disruption or Evolution?

A related webinar on ‘COVID-19: Child & Adolescent Mental Healthcare – Disruption or Evolution?‘ was held in July 2020. You can watch a recording of this webinar here.

World Mental Health Day

Today, October 10, is World Mental Health Day. In connection with this, we wanted to tell you about this great training tool:

We Can Talk is an online training tool to improve staff knowledge and confidence when supporting children and young people attending A&E and hospital wards due to concerns about their mental health.

It is free, takes less than an hour, and features young people with lived experience.

Click on the link below to start this training:

We Can Talk

Royal College of Psychiatrists

Useful Resources: Young People’s mental Health

The Royal College of Psychiatrists has a wide range of useful information about young people’s mental health written to support young people, as well as their parents and carers.

The information is written by psychiatrists and young people working together. It includes information on topics such as…

coping with stress
depression in children and young people
worries about weight and eating problems
drugs and alcohol
psychosis and schizophrenia for young people

Click on the links above to go to the specific section, or click on the link below to go an overview of all the information:

https://www.rcpsych.ac.uk/mental-health/parents-and-young-people

Journal Article: Care for children and young people with eating disorders

This article was published in the journal ‘Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry’ (June 2020) and may be of interest:

Paediatric medical care for children and young people with eating disorders: Achievements and where to next

Lee D Hudson and Simon Chapman

No other diagnoses epitomise the need for dual consideration of mental and physical health more than eating disorders. Anorexia Nervosa (AN) for example has the highest mortality rate of any mental health disorder, and half of deaths are thought to be due to physical complications (Sullivan, 1995). For this reason it is crucial for acute paediatrics and eating disorder teams to work closely over the assessment and management of these disorders, particularly in the early stages when physical risks are often highest.

This is not as easy as it sounds: mental health and physical health teams are often geographical distant from each other, have different ways of working, and may even view and speak of risk in different ways. Despite this, as for many countries, in the United Kingdom (UK), the journey to provide better paediatric care for children and young people (CYP) with eating disorders has been a gradual one, albeit with a number of recent victories. As two paediatricians working with CYP with eating disorders and eating disorder teams in the UK, we summarise the important developments of the past 10 years in the UK, and look to future steps…

To read the full article, click on the link below:

https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/pdf/10.1177/1359104520931573

Ourtime: resources for professionals talking to children about parental mental illness

Our Time helps young people dealing with parental mental illness. We make sure they get the support they need and have their voices heard.

This website has a lot of resources for Parents, Young People, Schools and Professionals

To find out more, click on the link below:

https://ourtime.org.uk/suitability-resources/professionals/

PAEDIATRIC MENTAL HEALTH: A NURSE’S PERSPECTIVE

CCCU BSc Child Nursing alumna Kim Cunningham discusses the unique mental health care needs of children, and her experience as a hospital lead for the ‘We Can Talk’ initiative.

I studied paediatric nursing at Canterbury Christ Church University (CCCU) and during my time as a student nurse I came across lots of children and young people with mental illness admitted onto the paediatric ward. Quite often they were just there for a short time, whilst assessed and discharged back to the community. However, sometimes those with more complex mental health needs, their admission stays were for a few days and sometimes weeks, whilst awaiting an inpatient bed.

https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/health-and-wellbeing/nursing-midwifery-social-work/child-nursing/paediatric-mental-health-nurse-perspective.aspx