Adverse childhood experiences: what support do young people need?

The National Institute for Health and Care Research (NIHR) recently published an interested article about supporting children who have had adverse experiences:

“Recent NIHR research aims to improve the lives of children and young people exposed to adverse childhood experiences. It identifies the types of support young people feel they need from services, and offers ways to support the mental health of children in care and those adopted from care…”

Click here to read more.

BACCH Summer Meeting

The West Midlands British Association For Community Child Health (BACCH) summer meeting will be held on Friday July 1st, 2022.

Venue: West Bromwich Albion Football Club. The Hawthorns, West Bromwich, West Midlands B71 4LF

New developments in Community Paediatrics through the pandemic
– Learning from the past, shaping the future

Click here to see the programme (may be revised)

Or click here to download an application form to register.

Webinar 18: The Role of Psychology within an Oncology Team   

Monday 25th April at 19.30 (on Zoom)

The next PMHA Trainee webinar will be on ‘The Role of Psychology within an Oncology Team’. The webinar will be delivered by Dr Angela Kirby, Clinical Psychologist at Addenbrooke’s Hospital and will also cover medically related trauma.  

Click here to sign up for the webinar 

Please sign up using your professional email address (@nhs.net or nhs.uk) and we will contact you when your registration has been approved.

ACAMH Event: Suicide in children and young people

The Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health (ACAMH) recently announced the following interesting event being held online on the 6th May 9.30am to 12pm.

Suicide in children and young people: Everyone’s concern

The topic of suicide has been identified as a high priority area, particularly in the context of Covid and lockdown, and subject we should all be concerned with. We need to identify those that need help early, and give them the support they need, and provide their support networks with the tools they need to assist. Additionally, we need to be helping families, friends, teachers, and these support networks work through the trauma in the aftermath of a suicide.

This practically focused online conference, organised by ACAMH Scottish Branch, will have talks from clinicians, education professionals, leading agency and charity professionals, and Public Health Scotland. Join us for the latest evidence-based research, and learn how you and your colleagues can better support those in need.

Who should attend

Mental health professionals, health professionals, education professionals, social workers and allied professionals, and those interested in the topic.

Key takeaways

  • How to identify better children and young people at risk of suicide and how to talk to them
  • Improved knowledge of range of services available to support children young people and their families
  • Improved knowledge about the differences in what differing services have to offer.


Click here for more information about the event and to book

Research highlight

Surveillance methodology has been widely used in paediatrics (British Paediatric Surveillance Unit, BPSU) and psychiatry (Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Surveillance System, CAPSS) to provide epidemiological data on conditions of interest. This study aimed to investigate the degree to which community paediatricians are involved in the care of children and young people (CYP) with mental health conditions, with implications for the surveillance of these conditions.

The authors concluded that community paediatricians are most involved in the care of children with neurodevelopmental disorders, and that joint BPSU and CAPSS surveillance would be recommended for these disorders. Whilst community paediatricians are also involved in the care of CYP with emotional difficulties, often due to limited access to CAMHS, it was felt that the decision for single or joint surveillance should be made after consideration of all relevant factors. The authors also highlighted the urgent need to expand CAMHS services in order to provide support for CYP with emotional difficulties, who are currently being managed by community paediatricians.

Involvement of community paediatricians in the care of children and young people with mental health difficulties in the UK: implications for case ascertainment by child and adolescent psychiatric, and paediatric surveillance systems

Ayyash HF, Ogundele MO, Lynn RM, et al. Involvement of community paediatricians in the care of children and young people with mental health difficulties in the UK: implications for case ascertainment by child and adolescent psychiatric, and paediatric surveillance systems. BMJ Paediatrics Open 2021;5:e000713. doi: 10.1136/bmjpo-2020-000713

Follow this link to read the full paper.

Research highlight

The bidirectional interplay between physical and mental health is well recognised, and yet the research methodology used to study the impact of childhood chronic illness on mental health outcomes has in the past often been suboptimal. A recently published longitudinal study aimed to remediate this by using data from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) to explore the relationship between chronic childhood illness and adolescent psychiatric disorders, including possible mediating factors, in children aged between 10 and 15 years.

One of the main study findings was that a high level of health-related school absenteeism was the most consistent predictor of mental health problems in adolescents. While there are multiple possible explanations for this, it nevertheless provides an important and interesting insight into the impact of chronic illness on a child’s life and health outcomes.  

Chronic illness in childhood and early adolescence: a longitudinal exploration of co-occurring mental illness

Brady AM, Deighton J, Stansfeld S. Chronic illness in childhood and early adolescence: A longitudinal exploration of co-occurring mental illness. Dev Psychopathol. 2021 Aug;33(3):885-898. doi: 10.1017/S0954579420000206. PMID: 32362290.

Follow this link to read the full paper.

Research highlight

Secure parent-infant relationships are a crucial factor in ensuring good mental and physical wellbeing throughout life. The Parent-Infant Foundation recently published this report, which includes a summary of qualitative and quantitative research conducted with parents, focusing on the parent-infant relationship.

Here are some of the key research findings, but do follow this link to read the full report (page 25-29 for the parent research).

  • Parents ranked the parent-infant relationship as the third most important influence on child development, below the impact of domestic violence and parental drug use.
  • 50% of parents thought there was not enough support available for developing the parent-infant relationship.
  • The fear of judgement and stigma are barriers to parents seeking support with their parent-infant relationship.

Securing Healthy Lives: An extended summary of research about parent-infant relationship help and support across Cwm Taf Morgannwg

Bateson DK., Sercombe M., Hamilton W. Securing Healthy Lives: An extended summary of research about parent-infant relationship help and support across Cwm Taf Morgannwg. Parent-Infant Foundation. December 2021.

Child in Mind Podcasts

The Anna Freud Centre has produced a number of expert podcasts to help parents and carers understand and manage mental health problems

To view these please click here

The Anna Freud Centre (National Centre for Children and Families) works in collaboration with children and young people, their families and communities to transform children and families’ mental health

You can go to their home page here.

Research highlight

Findings of the CLoCK study were published last week in the Lancet, outlining the physical and mental symptoms experienced by children and young people 3 months after infection with SARS-CoV-2. Researchers compared symptoms at baseline and 3 months between young people who tested positive for COVID versus those who tested negative.

Interestingly, the mental health, wellbeing, and fatigue scores were similar in the two groups. Striking, however, is the high proportion (about 40%) of children and young people who felt worried, sad or unhappy irrespective of whether they had COVID. Perhaps it reflects the fact that they have all been living through the pandemic’s isolation and school closures.  

Physical and mental health 3 months after SARS-CoV-2 infection (long COVID) among adolescents in England (CLoCk): a national matched cohort study

Stephenson T, Pereira SMP, Shafran R, et al. Physical and mental health 3 months after SARS-CoV-2 infection (long COVID) among adolescents in England (CLoCk): a national matched cohort study. Lancet Child Adolesc Health. 2022;0(0). doi:10.1016/S2352-4642(22)00022-0  

Follow this link to read the full paper.

PMHA Webinar 16: Functional Neurological Disorders

The next PMHA webinar will take place on Monday 21st February at 7.30pm. The topic of this webinar is ‘Functional Neurological Disorders ’ and it will be delivered by Dr Matthew Butler, academic Neuropsychiatrist at King’s College London

To book a place at the webinar, please click here.

Please sign up using your professional email address (@nhs.net or nhs.uk) and we will contact you when your registration has been approved.

Looking forward to seeing you there!