Article About Integrated Care

We would like to draw your attention to this recent research article published in the journal JCPP Advances by the Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health (ACAMH).


Integrated care to address child and adolescent health in the 21st century: A clinical review

Mina Fazel et al.

Background

Increasing specialisation and technical sophistication of medical tools across the 21st century have contributed to dramatic improvements in the life-expectancy of children and adolescents with complex physical health problems. Concurrently, there is growing appreciation within the community of the extent that children and adolescents experience mental disorders, which are more prevalent in those with complex chronic, serious or life-limiting health conditions. In this context, there are compelling reasons for paediatric services to move to a model of care that promotes greater integration of child psychiatry within the medical, somatic teams that care for children and adolescents in children’s hospitals.

Aims

In this article, we discuss the range of medical disorders managed by contemporary paediatrics.

Materials and Methods

We conducted a broad review of the literature and existing services, and use individual accounts to illustrate adolescents’ healthcare preferences in the context of the challenges they experience around their mental health.

For the full article click here


JCPP is a new open access journal in the field of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and related disciplines

Podcast: My Family, Mental Illness… and Me

The organisation Our Time, which seeks to help young people affected by parental mental health illness, has just launched what sounds like a fantastic new podcast called “My Family, Mental Illness… and Me”:

“At Our Time, we are very proud of this podcast. With it, we want to open up the conversation around parental mental illness. All of the guests who took part have or had a parent with a mental illness, or facing a mental health difficulty. Many have a significant public profile including: Joe Wicks, the nation’s PE teacher; BAFTA-winning screenwriter Kayleigh Llewellyn (In My Skin); comedian, author and actor Grace Campbell; and MP Neil Coyle. The interviews are brilliantly hosted by Dr Pamela Jenkins from the Mental Health Foundation, whose own mother had schizoaffective disorder.”

For more information about the podcast and the work which Our Time does, visit their website here.

Connected Child Health Website

We wanted to direct your attention to this fantastic website about physical and mental healthcare for young people. The site has been set up by Dr Rory Conn, a consultant Child and Adolescent Psychiatrist working in Exeter, Devon. Click on the image below to visit the site…

The website has an interesting blog section, where Dr Conn discusses different current issues and offers his own thoughts on working with the mental health of young people.

It also has a growing collection of useful resources for patients and families, as well as for professionals and students / trainees working in this area.

Members of the PMHA can find links to more great sources of information like this under the ‘Resources‘ section of this website. Not a member yet? Then why not join now?

All Emotions Are Okay!

Dr Sarah Temple, a GP and director of EHCAP – an organisation providing innovative solutions for education, health, care and prison services – has written a great book aimed at supporting children and families to be emotionally ready for school. The book, ‘All Emotions Are Okay’, is a bright and colourful exploration of the emotions young children, and their parents or carers, might feel when they start school.

Click on the picture to see and download the book

Click on the picture above, or click here, to see and download a pdf version of this book. You can also give feedback on the book.

Liaison Psychiatry / Paediatric Liaison Network

Liaison psychiatrists work at the interface between physical and psychological health.

Providing specialist mental health assessment and treatment for patients attending general hospitals, they deal with a range of problems including self-harm, adjustment to illness and physical and psychological co-morbidities.

The clinical content of liaison psychiatry practice is complex, and every day brings a new challenge.

Liaison Psychiatrists educate general hospital colleagues to improve their knowledge, skills and confidence in the basics of management of common mental health problems that they encounter in their practice.

Liaison psychiatrists work with medical and surgical colleagues as their patients can have high levels of mental health problems.

Also, patients with chronic disease may have difficulty managing their condition which liaison psychiatric input can help.

Child and Adolescent Mental Health is moving increasingly under the spotlight on political and public agendas. We are seeing almost daily media articles focusing on the rising rates of acute presentations of children and adolescents in crisis to Emergency Departments (ED), as well as the expanding waiting lists for community Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS). Although there have been developments in policy to address the needs of young people with mental health difficulties such as Future in Mind1, the Five Year Forward View for Mental Health2 and the Long Term Plan3; there is still a long way to go to achieve parity with adult mental health services, let alone physical health provisions.

The Psychiatric Liaison Accreditation Network (PLAN) Accreditation Committee were keen to broaden the scope of the current PLAN Quality Standards to encompass patients of all ages.

The standards in this document have been developed from current legislation, guidance and experts, and shared with members of the RCPsych Paediatric Liaison Network6 for their input and approval.

Quality Standards for Children and Young People for Liaison Psychiatry Services Royal College of Pschiatrists April 2019

Click here for full report

Questionnaire – The future of the PMHA Annual Academic Meeting

For many years now this meeting has been held at the end of January, in the lovely setting of Highgate House Hotel, in Creaton near Northampton. Unfortunately, this hotel has gone into administration and is being sold.

This year’s meeting was held online, because of the ongoing Coronavirus situation. Despite being very different, it was a really successful and interesting meeting.

We are now planning for next year’s meeting and are keen to get opinions on the best way forward for the PMHA Annual Academic Meeting

We would be very grateful if you could spare the time to let us have your views on next year’s and future ‘Highgate’.

Please click here to access a short questionnaire!

Let them play…

Allowing young children to play with their friends must be prioritised as soon as possible when lockdown is eased.

This was the argument made by this really interesting post published recently on the ACAMH Blog.

The article discusses the fact that while the Covid-19 pandemic has posed a lower risk of physical health problems for children, it has transformed the social lives of children more rapidly than anyone could have imagined.

A recent rapid systematic review concluded that loneliness and social isolation adversely affect children’s short- and long-term mental health (Loades, M. E. et al). 

You can read the full post on the blog by clicking here.

Guardian Article about Covid-19 and mental health

There was an interesting article about the Coronavirus and mental health in the UK published in the comment section of the The Guardian today. Have a read and tell us what you think…

Has the pandemic really caused a ‘tsunami’ of mental health problems?

Richard Bentall, Professor of Clinical Psychology: University of Sheffield

“With a team of experts from the Universities of Sheffield, Ulster, Liverpool, UCL and Royal Holloway and Bedford College I have been monitoring the mental health of the UK population since the beginning of the crisis. Looking at our findings, we think that this tsunami narrative is misleading. If accepted uncritically, it could undermine efforts to protect the health of the population and also our ability as a nation to recover once the crisis is over. Here is why….

Click here to read the complete article

Children’s Mental Health Week, 1-7 February 2021

The PMHA is delighted to be supporting #ChildrensMentalHealthWeek, organised by the charity @Place2Be. Of course, for those of us in the PMHA, every week is Children’s Mental Health Week, but this yearly event is an excellent opportunity to raise awareness of this issue more widely and start some important conversations at work and at home.

This past year has been an incredibly difficult one for many families, and we are starting to see more and more evidence about the effects that COVID-19, lockdown and school closures have had on children and young people in the UK and around the world. A poll at our annual meeting last week found that 97% of attendees had seen a change in children and young people presenting in acute crisis during COVID-19, with more than 7 in 10 seeing both increased numbers and increased complexity of presentation. And for every child presenting to hospital, there are likely countless more struggling at home.

“Express Yourself”

The theme of this year’s Children’s Mental Health Week is “Express Yourself”. Many of us can find it hard to talk about mental health, particularly with children and young people. Place2Be have compiled an excellent set of resources – available at https://www.childrensmentalhealthweek.org.uk/schools-and-youth-groups/ – to help start these conversations and empower children to express themselves in different ways.

Many young people may wish to seek support outside their immediate friends and family. @YoungMindsUK has compiled an excellent list of support services available by phone, text, email and web chat, available here: https://youngminds.org.uk/find-help/get-urgent-help/ 

Of course, it’s not only children who need help and support during these challenging times. @LittleGoodDeed is a campaign aimed at helping parents and carers who may be struggling during lockdown. If you can, try to take the opportunity this week to reach out to a friend, colleague or family member who may be struggling. If you’re struggling yourself, see https://www.littlegooddeed.org.uk/getsupportnow for a list of useful resources you can access online or by phone.

We at the PMHA will continue to share useful resources throughout this week and beyond, so don’t forget to follow us on Twitter and Facebook and, if you haven’t, sign up to become a PMHA member. We look forward to hearing more about how you’ve marked Children’s Mental Health Week and – crucially – how you keep that important work going in the weeks and months to come.

Paediatricians warn parents to be alert to signs of eating disorders

Paediatricians have seen a huge rise in cases of anorexia nervosa and other food restriction disorders in this age group, with some reporting a doubling, tripling or even quadrupling of cases compared with the same period last year.

For more information, please go to the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health (RCPCH) website by clicking here.

Help and support

BEAT eating disorders charity has a lot of useful information on their website and their helpline is open over the festive period.