ADHD study day in Liverpool

We heartily recommend this forthcoming ADHD and Allied Neurodevelopmental Services Symposium conference, organised by the ADHD Foundation. The conference will take place over two days in Liverpool on the 5th– 6th November 2015.

The presentations on the 5th November would be of interest to anyone working in a clinical capacity with adults/ young people with ADHD. The conference on the 6th November  is more focused upon how we achieve outstanding educational outcomes for children and  young people with ADHD.

Highlights of the conference on the 5th November include:

  • Examples of a range of new models of Service design, multiagency approaches and transformed ADHD Pathways from around the UK.
  • Latest developments in the National Autism Project.
  • Latest developments using digital technology in assessing core signs of ADHD.
  • New research in ADHD and Drug Use and ADHD and Neurofibromatosis.
  • Recent research into a significantly underrepresented group, Girls and Young women and ADHD.

Highlights of the conference on the 6th November include:

  • The results of a ten year research project in London into effective SEND provision and developing the role of the SENCO.
  • Lesley Cox, Lead HMI for SEND and Disability for OFSTED presenting “How OFSTED evaluate outstanding SEND provision.“
  • Girls and ADHD.
  • Using innovative technology in school to increase self regulation for learners with ADHD and increase attainment.
  • Workshops on outstanding practice with learners with dyslexia, dyscalculia and Tourette’s syndrome.

 

See below for more information on this conference, details of the speakers, booking arrangements and information about our conference dinner on the evening of the 5th November with Rory Bremner as the after dinner speaker. If you require any more information, please contact ella.duxbury-davies@adhdfoundation.org.uk

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National trainee day for paediatric mental health

Date:     7th January 2016

Venue: Conference Room, Children’s Neurosciences Centre, St Thomas’ Hospital, First Floor, Block D, South Wing, Westminster Bridge Road, London SE1 7EH. Tel: 020 7188 7188

This training day is designed to provide information and practical advice on various diagnostic and management issues related to mental health of patients and/or their family across acute and community paediatrics. We have focussed topics around those “most wanted” by Paediatric Trainees in a recent UK-wide survey.

Programme:10:00     Registration and coffee

10:15     Medically unexplained symptoms

Dr Lee Hudson, Consultant Paediatrician,  Great Ormond Street Hospital & Honorary Research Associate, Institute of Child Health

11:15     Self harm and emergency assessment

Dr Esther Sabel, Consultant Child and Adolescent Psychiatrist, Hertfordshire CAMHS

12:15     Lunch

13:00     Eating disorders – what do Paediatricians need to know and do?

Dr Nasima Matine, Consultant Child and Adolescent Psychiatrist, The Phoenix Centre, Cambridge

13:45     Behavioural and emotional difficulties – workshop

Dr Nicola Herberholz, Consultant Paediatrician/Paediatric Mental Health and Dr Bo Fischer Specialist Registrar in Paediatrics/Paediatric Mental Health

14:45     Coffee                                                                                                            

 15:00     Paediatric liaison

Dr Rory Conn, Specialty trainee Child and Adolescent Mental Health and Darzi Fellow in Quality Improvement and Patient Safety, Great Ormond Street Hospital

15: 45    Overview of psychological therapies and their indications

Dr Sophie Bennett, Research Associate, UCL Institute of Child Health & Honorary Clinical Psychologist, Great Ormond Street Hospital

16:30     Close and certificates

All for £50! Bargain!!

 Download application below! 

2nd_Paediatric_Mental_Health_Traingin_Day_Final

Contact :      Bo Fischer                           bo.fischer@nhs.net

Nicola Herberholz            nicola.herberholz@nhs.net

5 minute tips for anxiety in children and young people

This post allows you to give brief advice if it send that a child has problems with anxiety. It should be read after you have gone through our introductory post, and is intended for non specialists working in health services.

When to think of anxiety
Excessive anxiety is common in childhood, but is particularly common in chronic or recurrent pain (up to 80%) and in developmental conditions, especially autistic spectrum disorders.

What are the key questions to ask
Worries: in quiet moments, does the child worry about going to school, harm coming to their family or themselves, any imaginary creatures or anticipated events
Avoidance: anything that the child doesn’t do, or doesn’t want to do
Sleep: difficulty settling, frequent waking, nightmares
Eating: restrictive patterns, poor appetite

Safety checks: (seek advice if these are happening)
Is the child harming themselves, or consider doing so?
Does the child feel worthless?

What advice can you give?

There are two main forms that therapy takes, both of which can be applied in a ‘low-voltage’ fashion in non-specialist settings.

Firstly, it is helpful to draw out the thoughts and beliefs that underlie the anxiety.  This is not so that the adult can dismiss them as silly or mistaken, but so the child can be helped to compare the harmful cognitions with their other beliefs and feelings (e.g. monsters aren’t real) which can then be used to challenge the anxiety. Equally, it’s important when a child is worried about a particular event to talk through what consequences may result, and again check that the child really thinks these consequences are likely, and plausible. In some cases, especially involving social situations, it may that the child’s fears are justified, in  which case negotiation with third parties (teachers, family) would be useful.

Secondly, some kind of graduated exposure is often helpful. Say the child is scared of going to the toilet alone. Going with a parent, but with the parent then standing in the doorway would be a good start, which the child could be rewarded for. Next time, they would need to tolerate the parent being in the hallway in order to earn a reward, and so on.

These techniques are explained further in resources

Resources

This fact sheet can be a useful start for parents . Simple-ways-to-help-children-with-fears-and-anxieties

Cathy cresswell’s article in the Archives of Disease in Childhood is very good, as is her book for parents

The Mind Ed portal has a lot of information on anxiety. It’s designed for professionals, but there is really no reason why a motivated parent can’t access it, especially

The worried child

Anxiety disorders

The session on school avoidance is excellent, and there are loads of generalisable tips in it